Change Grow Live – health and social care charity

Bec Davison

Role: 
Director of Quality

Bec has worked at Change Grow Live since 2001. She works with staff and service users to ensure the organisation has the right systems in place to monitor its safety and quality improvement.

Background

Bec started volunteering at 14 at a homeless hostel and continued to volunteer previous to and post her Social Philosophy degree. Her interest in homelessness was fuelled by the visibility of rough sleeping and the discrimination that this group of people faced.

She now has over 20 years' experience of direct service delivery and management of services to rough sleepers, homeless people, substance misuse, offenders and those suffering from mental illness. Her social work training alongside the MBA and leadership training has given her a fantastic platform to progress a career built on her value base.

Change Grow Live has always been a creative, innovative, risk taking organisation that has welcomed diverse ideas to bring the best outcomes for those we work with. The creation of the Quality Team has given the organisation a unique opportunity to share ideas, consult with staff and service users to ensure we are providing the best possible tools and interactions to bring success for both staff and service users in their life journeys.

About Bec

Bec has always had an interest in how systems work and how to improve quality of services to better the lives of socially excluded people. She believes the quality agenda has never been so important in the history of the social sector. It is now undoubtedly acknowledged that quality improvement is interlinked with staff engagement, service user involvement and the creation of a fully inclusive organisation.

She has particularly enjoyed seeing people she worked with as clients become successful in the workplace against all the odds, and become powerful change agents to other service users. 

Blog

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